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I love learning and experimenting in the kitchen. You have probably figured that one out by now. But I never thought I would get as far as making my own vinegar. Why bother right? You can buy half a litre of the stuff for $3 at the supermarket. Well it came about something like this:

Juls: “Can you make a white wine reduction with that left over white wine?”

Nic: “Sure”

… 1 week later…

Nic: “I figured out how to make white wine vinegar today”

Juls: huh?

Nic: “Last week remember, you asked me to make white wine vinegar with that left over wine”

Juls: [eye rolling/laughing] “I said white wine REDUCTION” [extra enunciation]

Nic: Oh…

And before you ask, we don’t usually have left over wine. But things tend to change a little when your breast feeding.

Have fun experimenting.

Nicola

What hilarious misunderstandings have you had lately?

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White Wine Vinegar

Notes
Making your own vinegar is a bit like making your own yoghurt. You need friendly bacteria. The easiest way is to purchase unpasteurised and unfiltered white wine vinegar. You’ll know it by the cloudyness of the liquid and the ‘floaties’ hanging at the bottom of the bottle. The technical term for floaties  is ‘vinegar mother’. It is actually friendly bacteria  that speeds up the process of turning wine into vinegar.

The flavour of your vinegar will be reminiscent of the flavour of your wine so be sure to pick one you like.

Ingredients
3 cups of white wine
1 cup of white wine vinegar

Directions
In a large jar, mix the white wine and white wine vinegar together. Cover with a cheese cloth and let it sit in a cool spot at room temperature for one month. Taste test it to see if it is too your liking. If you want it a little stronger, leave it longer. You’ll know it has finished fermenting when the floaties have all sunk to the bottom. Transfer to a fresh jar or bottle and store in the pantry. You can strain out the floaties if you prefer, but I think the more good bacteria we get the better.

Remember to save a cup of vinegar with vinegar mother for your next batch if you want to continue making your own.

 

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